Counter-Violent Extremism

Zero tolerance for militancy in Punjab


Aoun Sahi

29 October 2015

Research Article

O n December 25th, 2014, nine days after Pakistani Taliban attacked Army Public School in Peshawar, killing 150, mostly children, the country’s political leadership approved a comprehensive 20-point National Action Plan against terrorism. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, in a televised address to the nation, described the incident as having “transformed the country.” Rare admission Beyond the usual vows of countering the “terrorist... Read More

Creating an environment that counteracts militant ideologies and radicalism in Pakistan


21 October 2013

Events

Ambiguous state policies, incoherent and often conflicting institutional responses, distorted education syllabi, and media’s inability to educate the people are among the factors that have let the perils of extremism and militancy grow in Pakistan. Failure to address these areas and to evolve and implement a comprehensive de-radicalization program in Pakistan would not only strengthen the militants’ ideological narratives in society but also weaken the... Read More

Countering Radicalization in Pakistan: Efforts must be initiated from within the society


19 July 2010

Events

It is important to challenge the extremist and literalist interpretations of Islam to prevent further radicalization in Pakistan and defeat the militant groups operating in the country. This was the crux of a seminar organized by the Pak Institute for Peace Studies on July 16, 2010, in Islamabad. The seminar was arranged to launch the latest edition of the organization’s quarterly journal, Conflict and Peace Studies. The journal contained the finding of a ... Read More

American Media has failed to play the Watchdog Role


07 July 2010

Events

The US media was “set up to fail” by the Bush administration as it prepared to invade Iraq in March 2003. This was stated by Katherine Brown, a Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University’s Department of Communications, during a presentation at Pak Institute for Peace Studies on July 2, 2010. She admitted that the American media had failed to play the watchdog role ahead of the war in Iraq, adding that most US news networks felt betrayed after they... Read More

Building an Empirical Knowledge base is Imperative to Counter-radicalization in Pakistan


25 May 2010

Events

Despite the phenomenal rise of radical ideologies in Pakistan, the country lacks an empirical knowledge base to form counter-strategies. These observations were shared with a visiting high profile European delegation of academics, practitioners and community lobbyists on 24 May 2010 here at PIPS. The delegation was comprised of Dr. Harald Weilnböck, a psychotherapist by profession and one of the leading European experts on radicalization, Alan Weston, associated with the European... Read More

9/11 Changed the Perceptions of Americans about Pakistan


04 May 2010

Events

“In Pak-US relations, 9/11 serves as water shed event which changed the perceptions of many Americans towards Pakistani Diaspora in US. It not only enhanced the feelings of hatered and mistrust between the two communities but also became a strong reason for imposing restriction on Muslims’ religious freedom in US”. These were the thoughts of Miss. Rabia Zafar--a PhD student at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford and an internee at Pak Institute for Peace... Read More

Taliban Insurgency is Thriving in FATA noted PIPS' New book


19 April 2010

Events

After September 11, 2001 the militant networks have become stronger and well entrenched in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan (FATA); while the militant economy has surpassed the volume of $ 6bn per annum. The dynamics of insurgency in FATA is very complex and intertwined with the recent developments in Afghanistan and thus have far reaching consequences for the regional security situation. In these circumstances a significant change in the mindset of Pakistani military... Read More

Understanding FATA


Syed Manzar Abbas Zaidi

22 January 2010

Research Article

The  Afghan  Islamists’  political  failure  to  produce  realistic  agendas  for  change1  is  cited  by  some analysts  as  an  example  of  the  failure  of  political  Islam.  Some  others  however  argue  that  Muslim societies  seem  to  have  been  characterized  in  the  20th  century  by... Read More
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About PIPS

The Pak Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS) is an independent, not-for-profit non governmental research and advocacy think-tank. An initiative of leading Pakistani scholars, researchers and journalists, PIPS conducts wide-ranging research and analysis of political, social and religious conflicts that have a direct bearing on both national and international security.

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