Federally-Administered Tribal Areas (FATA)

FATA reforms: journey so far and the way forward


Asmatullah Khan Wazir

05 July 2013

Research Article

The  Federally  Administered  Tribal  Areas  (FATA) are  governed  through  the  1901  Frontier  Crimes Regulation (FCR), which was enacted by the British to promote their own interests. This system was once lauded  as  a  success  and  liked  by  the  tribesmen.  However,  at  present  the  system  is  widely  seen  as authoritarian—both in its form... Read More

Understanding FATA


Syed Manzar Abbas Zaidi

22 January 2010

Research Article

The  Afghan  Islamists’  political  failure  to  produce  realistic  agendas  for  change1  is  cited  by  some analysts  as  an  example  of  the  failure  of  political  Islam.  Some  others  however  argue  that  Muslim societies  seem  to  have  been  characterized  in  the  20th  century  by... Read More

Building Infrastructure and Institutions is Imperative to Restore Peace in FATA


27 January 2009

Events

ICPVTR Director Dr. Rohan Gunaratna and PIPS Director Muhammad Amir Rana presiding over the session The deteriorating security and humanitarian situation in Pakistani tribal areas can be addressed by building infrastructure and institutions there. This was stated by Syed Adnan Ali Shah, PhD fellow and in-charge South Asia Desk at ICPVTR, Singapore, while delivering his lecture on “An overview of militancy in FATA” at PIPS on January... Read More

America Has Limited Role to Play in FATA: Joshua T. White


22 July 2009

Events

“The US leads the global war against terrorism, however, it has very limited role to play in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). The US should not or cannot deploy its forces in FATA, and such deployment is itself a bad idea. It is principal task of Pakistan to counter the militants in that region. But there are few things which can be done by the US to support Pakistani forces fighting in FATA. It can provide border trainings to the... Read More

Teachers asked to adopt critical thinking and an inclusive educational approach


03 June 2016

Events

PIPS workshop with teachers and educationists-II   Teachers need to adopt tools of critical inquiry in their own research as well as in teaching others. This will help them keep their teaching content and approaches uninfluenced by political and religious ideologies. While our textbooks and syllabus promote differences among students adhering to different faiths, teachers can play their role to break such stereotypes against one or another. These views were expressed by... Read More

About PIPS

The Pak Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS) is an independent, not-for-profit non governmental research and advocacy think-tank. An initiative of leading Pakistani scholars, researchers and journalists, PIPS conducts wide-ranging research and analysis of political, social and religious conflicts that have a direct bearing on both national and international security.

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